Anatomy of the Ear

The outer ear comprises the cup-like structure called the pinna, which directs sound to the ear canal

 

 


The outer ear comprises the cup-like structure called the pinna, which directs sound to the ear canal

 

 


The inner ear is a fluid-filled structure called the cochlea. The vibrating middle ear bones cause waves in the cochlear fluid, which sends electrical stimuli transmitted to the hearing nerve and the hearing centers in the brain. The balance system lies behind the cochlea.

 

 

Anatomy of Larynx

 The Vocal Ligaments and Conus Elasticus 

 


The conus elasticus is a membrane consisting principally of yellow elastic fibers, which interconnects the thyroid, cricoid and arytenoids cartilages. It underlies the mucous membrane below the vocal folds and is overlain to some extent by the circothyroid muscle on the exterior of the larynx. Observe the symmetry of the arytenoids cartilages
and their related vocal ligaments.
Source: Carmine D. Clemente, Anatomy: A Regional Atlas of the Human Body, 3rd Edition

 

 

The Rima Glottidis During Phonation (Shrill Tones) 

 


During the emission of shrill tones, the vocal folds are approximated and the vocal ligaments tensed resulting in a narrowing of the rima glottides to a thin slit.
Source: Carmine D. Clemente, Anatomy: A Regional Atlas of the Human Body, 3rd Edition